Saturday, November 7, 2009

Uncovering "The Holy Grail Of The Unconscious"

The phrase 'truth is stranger than fiction' rings throughout this article ("The Holy Grail of the Unconscious") regarding Carl Jung's mysterious
Red Book. It had long been considered by many to be the most important unpublished work in the history of psychology - but that all changed this past October as a facsimile of the Red Book, with introduction and extensive footnotes by Sono Shamdasani, was finally published. (You can order it for yourself off Amazon by clicking here.)

Below is an excerpt of The New York Times Magazine article where the story first premiered. Article available in full here.


This is a story about a nearly 100-year-old book, bound in red leather, which has spent the last quarter century secreted away in a bank vault in Switzerland. The book is big and heavy and its spine is etched with gold letters that say “Liber Novus,” which is Latin for “New Book.” Its pages are made from thick cream-colored parchment and filled with paintings of otherworldly creatures and handwritten dialogues with gods and devils. If you didn’t know the book’s vintage, you might confuse it for a lost medieval tome.

And yet between the book’s heavy covers, a very modern story unfolds. It goes as follows: Man skids into midlife and loses his soul. Man goes looking for soul. After a lot of instructive hardship and adventure — taking place entirely in his head — he finds it again.

Some people feel that nobody should read the book, and some feel that everybody should read it. The truth is, nobody really knows. Most of what has been said about the book — what it is, what it means — is the product of guesswork, because from the time it was begun in 1914 in a smallish town in Switzerland, it seems that only about two dozen people have managed to read or even have much of a look at it.

So for the better part of the past century, despite the fact that it is thought to be the pivotal work of one of the era’s great thinkers, the book has existed mostly just as a rumor, cosseted behind the skeins of its own legend — revered and puzzled over only from a great distance.

THIS COULD SOUND, I realize, like the start of a spy novel or a Hollywood bank caper, but it is rather a story about genius and madness, as well as possession and obsession, with one object — this old, unusual book...

Click here to continue reading

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